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    • FTC wins against OMICS November 23, 2017
      Interesting news, apparently breaking just today: https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2017/11/ftc-halts-deceptive-practices-academic-journal-publishers. The FTC has won a sweeping preliminary injunction against OMICS and three other defendants that “restrains the defendants from
    • RE: What system? Whose system? November 22, 2017
      This is the way I see it too. Of course you could argue that who determines the pricing is central – society or publishing partner. To establish that one would have to access to the contract between the society and the publisher – not realistic. Anthony From: osi20...@googlegroups.com
    • RE: What system? Whose system? November 22, 2017
      I would have to contact either Ted Bergstrom or Preston McAfee to be sure, but I believe they based their for-profit or not-for-profit judgment on who _owned_ a journal. For instance, Wiley, in particular after their purchase of Blackwell, publishes a LOT of journals on behalf of societies. I
    • RE: What system? Whose system? November 22, 2017
      Interesting hypotheses though David if you can find some numbers to back this up---that for-profits get far more submissions (on average) than their nonprofit counterparts and therefore spend far more time evaluating and rejecting articles and therefore have higher costs per article (because the
    • RE: What system? Whose system? November 22, 2017
      I can’t speak to their exact methodology, David. I’m pretty sure they had no data on rejection rate. As for controlling for articles per journal, that’s at the very least irrelevant for the mean and median cost per article numbers. If you know a journal’s annual cost and you know how many
    • RE: What system? Whose system? November 22, 2017
      Not to throw cold water on this Mel---it sounds interesting---but if you go to Ted Bergstrom’s website (journalprices.com) and download the full dataset, it looks like the classification of who’s “for-profit” and who’s “non-profit” is a real hodgepodge. Wiley, Sage, Oxford, Springer, T&F and
    • Re: What system? Whose system? November 22, 2017
      Did they control for the number of articles per journal and the rejection rate? Those are the primary cost drivers. Innovation is another. David On Nov 22, 2017, at 2:53 PM, Mel DeSart wrote: Maybe many non-profits have much the same business practices as their for-profit
    • RE: What system? Whose system? November 22, 2017
      Maybe many non-profits have much the same business practices as their for-profit counterparts, but their pricing, at least when it comes to journal publishing, is markedly different. See http://www.journalprices.com/2013_FinalSummaryForWeb.xlsx. The researchers that compiled these data are
    • Happy Thanksgiving! November 22, 2017
      Some light reading for your pre-holiday excursion, from a paper titled “The effect of the Thanksgiving Holiday on weight gain.” https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2891-5-29 (personally, my problems start with Halloween…).Happy Thanksgiving everyone! Table 3: Body
    • Re: What system? Whose system? November 22, 2017
      At some point I think it would be interesting to have a conversation about how we should think about the difference between, on the one hand, a non-profit journal that realizes large surpluses by charging for access to its publishing services, and on the other hand, a non-profit journal that

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